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Using video to improve teaching is a Course

Using video to improve teaching

Jun 16 - Jun 17, 2020

$670 Enroll

Full course description

Description

The challenge with observation is that often we end up seeing what we want to see and we can be guided by our cognitive biases. The process of observing is like interpreting a Rorschach Image—one of those ink blot images that psychiatrists show to their patients—where some say they can see their mother and others JFK.

Classroom observation is a powerful tool to improve one's practice, but often relies on a highly skilled observer to provide helpful feedback. Using self-captured video allows you to engage in powerful conversations with colleagues by viewing your teaching and learning together,  and provides the  opportunities to press pause. It is also an excellent tool for self-reflection. In this workshop we will examine different models for using video observation, the do's and don'ts for capturing a class, the types of technology you'll need and tools to use for reflection and feedback.

The research on micro-teaching also suggests that the act of video recording lessons and then peer-reviewing those recordings can have significant impact.

(Education Cargo Cults Must Die, John Hattie and Arran Hamilton, 2018)

Key Takeaways                

Different models of video observation

Suggestions for how to use self-captured video for professional growth

Tips for recording lessons

Tools for reflection and feedback

Presenter Information

Deb Carmichael                

Deb Carmichael has worked in Independent schools for over 25 years as a teacher, department head and in senior executive roles. During this time she was involved in a number of projects including professional learning models, classroom observation, student leadership and curriculum development. Deb is now a Senior Advisor at Independent Schools Victoria, working in The Development Centre. This allows her use her experience, ideas, understanding of current research and passion for teaching and learning to engage and work with fellow educators.